Ranthambhore National Park Trip Report – part 2

16 10 2009

Day 3
Pretty birds and lazy cats

I was on a very bumpy road but we were hot on the trail of a tiger. We took a blind turn and there he was. Just like that. Wait, it did not look like a tiger, it was more like a African lion. A huge one. Straight out of Ghost and the Darkness. My camera won’t click. What was wrong!!! I remembered something from the book “Maneaters are cursed. Camera won’t click them”. I took the battery out and my lens mount broke and the precious 100-400 landed on the concrete. I started banging my camera on the jeep. Thats when I got up. The banging was the knocking on the door. It was my wakeup call. 5:30 am. Nightmares…

I got down by 6:10 am and avoided the morning tea. It was colder than before. Actually the coldest day in my whole trip. Salim came up with the same optimistic smile and informed me that we are going to try our luck in Zone 3. I liked Zone 3 and welcomed the opportunity of not having to go through zone 4. My back was not ready for action yet. We got on to the main road and then we realized the gravity of the situation. It was cloudy, misty, dark and cold. Perfect weather to let the camera be in the bag and hands in the warm jacket. As we entered Zone 3, the visibility was down to a few meters. The weather was not going to let up today. We drove around and found everything enveloped in the mist and hardly any animal activity. After making a futile round, we came back to Padam Lake and parked there. A lone cormorant was giving a wing display. A treepie was hanging around hoping for some food. A few ducks were swimming lazily. It was almost as if the birds were still waiting for the morning. A pair of Red-wattled lapwings joined the cormorant and were going about their business.

A cold morning

A cold morning

Padam Talao

Padam Talao

All of a sudden the Lapwing male started fluffing up and flaunting its wingspan. It was a pleasure to watch. I am guessing its the mating ritual. It went on for about half a minute but the male was not to get lucky this cold morning, female flew away. The male was left dejected and contemplating its options before it followed the female.

Trying to impress the lady

Trying to impress the lady

Cmon Baby

C'mon Baby

Dejected

Dejected

Salim drew our attention towards something on the ground. As we looked really hard, we realized there were tiny birds looking for grass seeds. though they looked like common sparrows, they were smaller than them. I think he told me they were named Sparrow finches. As we saw them, some more pretty birds started coming around.

Ashy crowned saprrow finch

Ashy crowned saprrow finch

A winter visitor

A winter visitor

Birdy

Birdy

Spotted Owlets

Spotted Owlets

Reflection

Reflection

Anyways, as we moved on some spotted deers decided to come out and have a drink. We left them in peace and started our journey back. As it was too cold, Salim offered us some hot “Aloo Vadas” and Samosa with tea. How can anyone reject such an offer. While having tea, I told Salim that I wanted to see Sandgrouse. He told me that he will see what he can do. For going back to hotel, he instructed the driver to take another route. While on that route he was scanning the area and suddenly he spotted the bird. Once again we tried our best to locate what he spotted but it was not until we came really close to the birds we saw them. There were 2 pairs of them. One resting and another busy feeding.

Painted Sandgrouse

Painted Sandgrouse

Male Painted Sandgrouse

Male Painted Sandgrouse

I was happy to see them. Everytime I visit Ranthambhore now, I will go looking for them. As we started from there, on a wall we came across something unusual. There was a red faced monkey grooming a langoor. I have never seen that happening. They are generally arch-enemies.

An unusual couple

An unusual couple

While on the way back we decided that if anyone asks what did we see, we are gonna say a mother and two young ones. A trick that earned us quite a few looks.

Back at the breakfast table, there were three Aussie ladies, who had another glimpse of a tiger and it was their first safari. Well, some people have all the luck, we were content with just great breakfast.

After lunch we decided to split the group differently. My much better half and the cub decided to join other friends. I went ahead with my friend Imtiyaz (Bhai). Zone allocation was Zone 4 and 5. As no one from our group had been to zone 5, we decided to take zone 4 and let rest of the group go to zone 5. I was bracing myself for another bumpy ride and was contemplating if I had enough Iodex when I came back. As we started, Salim said “Sir ji, today we will see nothing but tiger and will not stop for anything else”. All my attempts to ensure him that there was no pressure were futile. As we entered zone 4, quickly scanning the area for pugmarks, we saw an imperial eagle perched on a dead tree on the fringes of Malik talao. Though we wanted to get a good look, Salim vetoed us out. Our driver Goldie was being very vigilant as well. I was mentioning that I had not seen bush quails so far, and he braked very hard. There they were, right next to the jeep. Are they fast?? I did not get a chance to capture one on my camera, but at least I got a good look.

Distant raptor

Distant raptor

As we moved further on the road, we came across a black shouldered kite perched on a branch. It was querying it’s area for an evening snack and gave us a chance to capture it even though the sun was on the wrong side. As we moved on the forest was quite. A few deers here and there going about their business. We moved on towards Semli junction.

BSK

BSK

After a bone jarring journey, we arrived at Semli junction. We met a guard coming back from there. He informed us that all was quite there. We settled in our seats and moved on anyway. We took a downhill road from the junction and came towards a green patch on the way. There were palm trees and a little water. The jeep halted silently.

“Tiger Tiger” whispered Goldy, our driver. All of a sudden we snapped to attention. There she was. My first Tigress. The Stripped Orange Godess. Sitting near the waterhole in the shade. I almost forgot that I have a camera with me. It was mesmerizing to see her in her domain. Bhai whispered “He is big” and I corrected him. All of a sudden we realized we were looking at two cats. Yes, a male and a female cub. Siblings, said Salim. They were the cubs of Semli female, about 9-10 months old. They were in no hurry and were being cats. Camera shutters started clicking. All of a sudden I felt foolish to have bought only 10 Gig worth of cards with me.

Tiger

Tiger

Tiger

Tiger

The male cub exploded in a charge, I barely managed to get a half decent picture of it. As I looked for the victim of this 5 meter dash, I found myself chuckling. The fierce tiger was hot on trails of a squirrel. But then boys will always be boys. By the way even when I say cubs, you may not want to cuddle them like a kitty. They were half grown tigers and were big. I did not try but I am sure he could have squashed me with just one swipe of his paw. Lucky for me, the cats were on a low fat diet and a fat photographer did not promise much nutrition to them.

Tiger

Tiger

Tiger

Tiger

Tiger

Tiger

After almost 15-20 minutes, we heard a little commotion behind us. A canter full of tourists was approaching the scene fast. All of us started gesturing them to make a silent entry and after a while the driver of the canter agreed to comply. It was too late by then. Cubs had become a little uneasy already. They started moving away. Salim told us that they will cross road a little further. We followed them slowly. By now even the canter driver was acting sensible.

Tigers

Tigers

As we moved along the cubs, we came across a little dune kinda formation. As we were climbing, I noticed ears, then eyes and then the face. It clicked to me. Another tiger. I was wrong. It was a Tigress, the Semli female. Sitting there right in front of us she made me understand the Royal part of “Royal Bengal Tiger”.

Momma Tiger

Momma Tiger

Tiger

Tiger

The cubs came and greeted their mother. After the formalities the family started moving on and went into the bushes after a while. By now the commotion behind us was too great already. There were jeeps coming from all directions. We decided to leave the prime seats and let the family be. As we were leaving the scene, a foreigner lady said “Tigers, there are tigers in the bushes. You might see them if you try a little”. Salim replied “Yes, We know” with a sly smile. Poor lady was watching us in amazement as we left the sighting without trying to see the tigers.

Tigers

Tigers

Mood in the jeep was jubilant and there was a silly grin on all our faces (I wonder why). Every jeep in the zone was hurrying up to the spot. Whole zone 4 was empty. As we crossed Malik Talao, we came across a little opening where some Sambars were enjoying their evening Snack. Salim asked the driver to stop again. As we stopped, he folded his arms and sat back in his seat. I asked him what was it. He said something is not right. One Sambar was alert and was looking into far away grass. We decided to sit back as well and give a rest to our backs. One by one jeeps from previous sightings started coming back. Everyone asked what we were doing, all we said was waiting. No other guide or tourist insisted to wait with us. They had already seen tigers or parts of them and they wanted to move on. After a while we were almost all alone there. Only one official jeep kept faith in us and joined up. Suddenly there was an alarm call. We all moved to a road where we will have a better vantage point. We sat there and waited. Then it happened. She emerged from the tall grass and walked towards us.

Machli - The tigress

Machli - The tigress

Machli, the most photographed tigress of Ranthambhore. She was coming right at us. Confidently strolling she made her way. By the time she came out of the thicket she was too close for me to get a photograph of her on my 100-400. I checked and AF won’t work, she was closer than 1.8M, the minimum focusing distance. She paid no attention to us, marked her territory before walking up in the grass a few meters further. We saw her spellbound till she disappeared completely in the distance.

Machli - The tigress

Machli - The tigress

Thrilled, we dashed back towards exit. It was close to gate timings. As we exited from the park, we were all smilling funny. A canter was waiting near the road for the formalities to complete. A man asked us if we got lucky. We replied, yes, we did. He asked how many did you see and we replied 4. A boy sitting right with him suddenly got disappointed “They saw 4 and we did not even get 1??”. Seeing the boy getting disappointed I said “Don’t worry, two of them were just cubs” and he got pushed to the verge of tears. The dad gave us a mock warning and we moved on.

As we joined the other group in the resort, we realized we were in big trouble if they have not seen a tiger. We got some choice words for our luck which only best of the friends can part with. Dinner time was upon us and tonight we dine with tiger stories. We met up with another family who missed seeing a tiger in Corbett and they were trying their luck here. Around the bonfire conversation was really funny.

“Did you see tiger?”
“yup”
“How many?”
“4, 2 cubs and 2 adults”
“What!!!!!”
“<Grin>”
“Are you a professional?”
“Nope”
“You keep visiting these national parks?”
“Not yet, this is our first visit. But I have a feeling that every now and then we will be here”
“Lucky @#@$#”
“Cheers”

While having dinner Salim saw me and told me that tonight I will have worse backache. Tiger sighting generally result in a very sore back. I was puzzled but then I realized, holding your body in various positions motionless is the cause. We spoke a while and he retreated back to safe heaven as my dear wife accused him of not being fair. He promised they are going to see the Tiger tomorrow. As he left our group got into talks and silly giggles with promises of an orange tomorrow.

Salim was right about the sore back. Remember Iodex is your friend.

Day 4
Cold mornings

Today we got zone 1 and zone 3. As other members of our party had not been to zone 1, we opted for zone 3. We were joined by two members of the family we met last night. As we had enough room in the jeep we welcomed the company of the ladies. It was another cold morning. As expected nothing much was happening due to mist but we drove on anyway. We came very close to possible tiger sighting but no one could find the tiger. After waiting a while we decided to head back to Padam Lake. We decided to drive around on smaller paths to see if anything interesting could be found. The sun was up by then. As we stopped near a stream, Salim said “There, a Shikra”. Right there it was. In front of the jeep sitting in the stream, hopefully after just finishing his drink. Clicks clicks clicks the cameras moaned.

Shikra

Shikra

As we were about to exit from the gate, we saw a peacock perched against clear blue sky. We started shooting it and it decided to take a flight. I was prepared this time and I got it in full flight. As an added bonus, it was in focus. My first almost successful BIF.

PIF

PIF

PIF

PIF

We got back to the breakfast. Other party had a tour and had nothing new to report. We decided to take a rest till lunch.

After a nice heavy lunch, we decided to cram into one jeep. Generously we decided to let go of one jeep and all of use got into one. It was not to be a photographic drive but a fun drive. Bad jokes found their way in the jeep and we went on. I was getting quite acquainted with the roads of Zone 4. Familiar bumps welcomed me. Salim told my wife “Madam, I promised, today you will see the tiger”. And our party went on. We crossed Semli area and stopped a while to waited for alarm calls. None came. We moved on and scanned an area all the way till a small water reserve. Nothing. As we were waiting, other people started arriving and waiting with us. Then an alarm call came. A Sambar was announcing presence of a predator in the area. A langoor joined up in the wake. Salim scanned the area and pointed at something distant. Cubs he said. We strained our eyes and finally saw the shapes. The cubs were moving amongst tall golden grass. Only their heads were visible whenever they scanned the area. Slowly they came a bit near, but still to far for good pics. There was a lot of commotion around as about 10-12 vehicles were trying to get a good look. They were not going to come out of their nice calm environment to these noisy creatures. After a few minutes when everyone had a look at them through the Binos, we decided to move on. At least one less vehicle to bother them.

Tiger

Tiger

Tourists

Tourists

Owl

Owl - Can you find it?

As we were getting out, we came across a cantor halted in the middle of the road blocking the exit. “Tiger” Salim said. We stopped. In a few seconds, she emerged on the side of the road. Nearly as close as Machli had been the other day. Our hearts skipped a beat when this huge cat looked at us. In barely 1 minute we spent with her, she got so close that I had to resist an urge to reach out and touch her. Wise decision on my part. This was T-17, a collared tigress, who was patrolling her area. We got out of the park. Everyone in the jeep running short of breath while Salim was taking a breath of relief.

“You guys will need Iodex tonight” I said to all of them. Indeed the tiger god was smiling down on us. We left the  park with a heavy heart as this was to be our last drive inside the park.

Day 5
Magical secrets

We had no safaris booked for this day. We were to catch a late night train to get back to Bombay. Aditya, our host gave me an option to visit a nearby buffer area. The place is called Kundal. This place shares its boundary with Zone 1. A tigress and her 2 cubs were seen on a kill in this area a couple of days back. They could still be there, Aditya said. “This place has other wildlife as well, you will not be disappointed”.

We made the right choice and trusted him. Salim came and picked us up and we were on the way. Through the narrow lanes of the sleepy town of Sawai Madhopur. We got to kundal and started scanning the area. Within 5 minute we came across a crowd of jeeps. Salim said it got to be a tiger. So many of them won’t stop for an owl or jackal unlike his current clients.

Tiger

Tiger

Well, he was wrong. It wasn’t a tiger. It was “Tigers”. Two more cubs. These were the cubs of the Zone 1 female. We were thrilled. We were feeling lucky. We had seen 7 different tigers in last 2 days. Which was more than what other around us had seen. My reward was not just Tigers but everything. Small Kingfihers to Jackals, Owls to Spotted Deers. Everything.

Well, the cubs were a fair distance away and were partially hidden by the bushes. We tried to take some photographs but it did not look like we would have much success with that. The cubs had a drink in the stream and then started going to the thicket. They were not gonna move in the day. They had a nice big meal waiting for them from last nights kill. The mother showed no signs of showing up. We waited there a while, but then decided to move on and see more of Kundal.

As we moved a little further, we came across a couple of Jakals returning from the nights hunt. It was still very early morning and light was bad. We had a chance to shoot them and did the best we could with the conditions.

Indian Jackal

Indian Jackal

As we moved we came across a lone chinkara sitting in the golden grass of kundal. The soft light of the morning had started to make its way onto it. After a few minutes of waiting in silence, he stood up but did not move away. When he took his first step we realized. Due to the cold night, one of his knee was kinda frozen. He will have to wait for that knee to get ok before he could move on. This whole incident happened just about 50 feet away from where we had seen Jakals. Lucky guy.

Plum Headed Parakeet

Chinkara

Chinkara

Chinkara

Chinkara

As we moved a little further, we came across a lil family of spotted owls. There were 4 of them. Sitting in the soft light without moving were my favorite birds.

Owls

Owls

A few minutes down the road, we came across a Buzzard. I forgot which one was that. As we moved we came across a family of blue bulls. The female was looking great through the mist in the early light. I managed to get a shot but they were a bit shy there.

Blue Bull - Female

Blue Bull - Female

As we stopped and waited under a tree, a shrike came and perched right next to us, while a sambar deer was volving in the waterhole.

Sambhar

Shrike

We got back to the resort after a while to the rest of the people to tell them about the tigers. A few choice words later, we were congratulated by everyone.
We wanted to return to Balas for the noon drive as well, but the news of the sighting had spread. Only 4-6 jeeps were allowed to enter the area so we decided to go somewhere else. Aditya suggested that we should try Balas. Another Buffer zone area which is somewhat different from the national park. We trusted his judgment and went ahead with the plan. As we were waiting at the reception of Balas for Salim to finish the formalities, we spotted quite a few birds there.

Plum headed parakeets were shouting there lungs out. I messed up the shots. I could have gotten better but anyways. While trying to shoot the noisy birds a sound registered to me. It sounded like a machine gun. Woodpecker all of us said in unison. We looked around and saw the little guy busy having a go at a tree nearby. Again the fast moving bird defied my ability to shoot it. I just managed to get a record shot, but soon I will have a nice shot of him.

Balas is famous for its vultures and I could see why. It’s an ideal place for them to nest. Unfortunately we did not have a sighting but this place again deserves a visit next time I am in Ranthambhore for a longer period.  After the drive as we were getting back Salim took us through the old town to get some really hot Dal vadas. Spicy and hot, what a combination that is. Specially on a cold evening.

As we got back we barely had the time to grab some dinner and rush to the station. We bid our goodbyes to our hosts Aditya, poonam and to Salim.The train was already waiting for us. We got into the compartment as the train started slithering away from the station. In the dark of the night I saw Sawai Madhopur vanish with a heavy heart. Only a few minutes and we would have missed the train… Alas next time.
_____________________________________________________________

I would like to list some of the lessons learned by me on this trip for everyones benefit.
1. A guide can make or break your trip. We were lucky, a lot of people are not that lucky.
2. If photographing wildlife is what is on your mind, take a jeep and make sure there are not more than 4 tourists in it. You can do that by booking the whole jeep.
3. Take as many cards as possible with you. I had 10 gig and a 40 gig hard drive with me. Hard drive failed. Backup your images daily and make 2 backups of backup. DVDs are cheap. You would not want to loose all your images. Shoot raw as much as possible.
4. Do not rush for the most celebrated animal. You will miss a lot of small wonders. Relax, stop and smell the roses.
5. Do not mix tea/coffee with a cold morning on a bumpy ride.
6. Buy a beanbag. It helps even if you have IS on your lens.
7. Keep your guide and driver happy (Read tips). You will make many good friends.
8. Iodex. Nuff said
9. Master your equipments before you leave for a trip like this. You would not want to be fiddeling with settings when the action starts.
10. Take the longest lens with you for the trip.
11. Get close to wildlife and let them accept you. Better, let them come to you. Do not corner or scare them.
12. Nature does not work on our schedule. I met too many people who were expecting tigers to be sitting at a pre-designated location, concept of wild animals moving around was too much for them.
13. Take your eyes off the camera and live a little. 🙂
14. Take a small logbook to note down the names of the animals/birds. Your memory will fail and you will not remember much.

What to take there:
1. Take cleaning supplies for your geat with you. It’s an arid reagion. Dust gets into everything.
2. Take only the gear you plan on using. There is no point in taking all the gear you have. I felt the follwoing should be enough:
A 100-400mm for all around shooting and wildlife
A 24-105mm for general shooting and landscapes
A 500mm/600mm if you have one and you are into birds
2 bodies, One main, one backup. It will also reduce the number of lens changes you may do in the dusty tracks.
Flash is not allowed in the park. There are a lot of places around the park where you can use one for shooting interiors and portraits
At least 2 batteries for each body
A box of DVDs and a USB Hard drive. Backups are very important.
A mini-laptop if you have one. I plan on buying one of those cheap netbooks (about 1600 aed)

3. Decembers are cold. When I say cold I mean you will be praying that nothing interesting comes up cause touching the gear will hurt.
4. Take a good pair of gloves. Not too thick as it will hamper your ability to handle your SLR.
5. April onwards the place is hot but its great for sightings.

Light conditions:
1. Your best shooting time is in the morning. Softest light and good chance for shooting backlit subjects.
2. Afternoon drive starts at 2pm. Light is harsh but gets softer in a while. Great for shooting in true golden light.
3. When the animals are in shade you will have to use your judgement. Light varies from being soft to quite dark. Over exposing by 1/3 helps.
4. The safaris are scheduled to make sure you make best use of available light. Conditions can vary depending on sand storm, cloud cover or mist.

Travel Arrangements:
1. Getting an accommodation there is no big deal. There are various resorts to suit everyone’s requirements. From guest houses to Taj and Oberoi. Try Ranthambhore Bagh, you will thank me for recommending them.
2. There are two modes of booking a safari. You have a choice between Cantor and Jeep.
Cantor is a 20 seater open truck. Provides you with a higher vantage point and is cheaper. It can be booked at the last minute as well. But there are still 19 people who may not think like you. They will stop only when the guide and driver decides. There is a good chance of Camera shake due to 20 people moving about.
Jeeps are open top. Gives you a lower angle and can accomodate only 6 people (max). They are expensive and not exactly your landcruiser kind of comfy. Also they are very hard to get, I booked mine 6 months in advance. But you can stop them at your wish. You can talk to guide and driver to ensure they understand your requirements well.
3. There had been a recent change in administration of the park. It has been handed over to Forest department from Tourism department. This change makes it even more difficult to book jeeps as there is a lot of red tape involved.
4. Jaipur is the closest airport. It takes 3-4 hours drive to reach the park. If you are coming from Bombay or Delhi, there are various trains available which is the best option comfort and economics wise.

Difficulties:
1. As there is a govt. department involved, there may be hiccups sometimes. You should be open to change your plans.
2. Roads are bumpy and most of the times you can not call them roads. Trusty Gypsy does a good job there, but if you are used to UAE roads be prepared for taking a painkiller everyday.
3. Not a difficulty faced by me but just an observation. If you are going to share a vehicle with some strangers for the drive be open to adjust. Not everyone is alike and different people have different views. I saw a lady slapping another guy in a cantor at my tiger sighting. His offence was that he did not give her the spot where he was standing, as far as I know. Not a position I would like anyone to be in.
4. Sometimes it was too overcast for shooting anything decent.

Landscapes:
If you dream of golden grass, amber fall leaves and dry forests, thats what you get in December. Landscapes in that area are breath taking and in their unique way. I did not take landscapes this time, but have planned what I would be doing next time





Ranthambhore National Park – Trip Report

3 06 2009

Warning:

It’s a long post and a lot to read. This is part one of my trip report for my visit to Ranthambhore national park in India. As a trip report, the emphasis is on the report. If you don’t want to read all of it, you scroll through the page and you will be able to see most of the selected pictures. Once I am done making Part 2 of report, I will post a link for seeing just the pictures. So those who might not have any interest in reading, can wait till then.

_____________________________________________________________

It had been more than a year since I took leaves from work. Being in Dubai and seeing endless construction was making me miserable. To top it, my family was on a long leave in India. So I packed my bags and started my vacations. I was missing natural surroundings that you have everywhere in India. This time we decided to take a break from everything and spend some time with our natural heritage. I made the arrangements and got us a 4 day break in Ranthambhore national park. This park is very famous for it’s tiger population but I was not bothered with them. Being in a non-concrete jungle was a lure enough for me. Some friends and family joined up and we had a small party of 5 and a quarter for the trip (my son is just 9 months old).

Day 1
And so it begun.

Ranthambhore National Park is about 4 hours drive away from Jaipur. After spending couple of weeks with my family there, we started from Jaipur. The plan was to start as early in the morning as possible. Target was to get out of Jaipur by 8am. But after a heavy breakfast and bidding goodbyes got us to start by 9:30 am. The route was scenic with mustard fields on both sides of the roads. Road conditions were not too bad and we reached our resort by 1pm. Our next safari was due in another 90 minutes. All formalities were hurried up and we had a almost quick lunch. Almost quick I say, as I had underestimated the power of great food. Excellent food from our hosts was to blame for the delayed start of our first glimpse of the magical place. On my special request, and my luck, our host arranged for a truly excellent guide for us. His name is Salim and he is the best guide for Ranthambhore. I am going back only if Salim is available for guiding me.

We had 2 gypsies booked for our party so we had enough freedom and it was great for photography. There was no need to jostle with 20 strangers in canter to get a good view of anything. On my first drive, I was assigned Zone 3. Zone 3 is the most picturesque zone that I saw. With lakes and great birdlife, it was buzzing all around. As we had a baby with us in our Jeep, we decided to take it slow on the first day. We took our first stop at Padam Lake. Aditya (our host) pointed our attention towards a croc sleeping on a rock. Honestly I would have missed it completely had it not been shown to me. Just a few meters away from us was a Snakebird (Anhinga) basking in the sun. A hopeful egret was looking for snacks in the shallow waters. Parakeets were making sure they were heard and in general I was hoping that time will freeze and I will be there forever.

Langoor Monkey

Langoor Monkey - an alert sentry

Anhinga - The Snake Bird

Anhinga - The Snake Bird

Lazy Crock

Lazy Crock

Moving on from Padam lake, we went further in Zone 3 and came across a family of spotted deers grazing. I was wondering how others will pass these creatures, knowing that you can find them everywhere. Spotted deers can be found everywhere in Ranthambhore (from what I saw) but everytime I see them, I want to stop and enjoy being with them. Specially if they have young ones around.

Young Spotted Deer with Mom

Young Spotted Deer with Mom

Chital on golden grass

Chital on golden grass

No messing with those antlers

No messing with those antlers

Conference Call

Conference Call

As we moved further on, we came across a pair of spotted owls. It was love at first sight. Really, for me they are just as majestic as eagles or falcons. As we watched, both of them cuddled up together and looked curiously at us. We decided to move on and not disturb them. Unfortunately I could not get any keepers here yet.

Further down the road we came across a Grey heron in breding plumage. A black headed ibis was around for the company. As we moved on, we came across a fresh kill or rather remains of a fresh kill. A peacock was ambushed and killed. Looking at the scene it looked like a battle ground. Colorful feathers all around telling the story of what happened. Our guide told us to be silent. “Must be a cat’s work” he said, “If you keep quite, you may hear bones crunching”. There was a loud thumping sound. Heartbeats are irritating sometimes. There was a rustling sound in the bushes. Tension was mounting. Salim said “Must have been a carcal” and my head became dizzie. A Carcal. Beats tiger anyday. Alas, that was not to be. We waited for about 20 minutes, but nothing came of it. Excitement of being so close to a kill was the reward for me.

As we drove back, we stopped at Rajabag lake. An egret was standing at the far end of the lake. The usual suspects were around the edge looking for food. We took out a pack of biscuits and broke one in the hand. All of a sudden we were getting mobbed by the over friendly treepies. Oh yes, I am guilty of feeding a wild animal and ashamed of it but it felt to darn good to have such a close encounter.

A winter visitor

A winter visitor

This is where we concluded our first day at the park. We drove back reluctantly and under the threat of heavy fines. As we drove back from the park, we realized how hungry we were. Spent the first night with good food, folk music, bonfire, bad jokes and most important with great friends. As the next safari was scheduled at 6:30 am, we all dragged ourselves to the rooms by 11:30 pm.

Day 2

Meet Zone 4

We got our wakeup call by 5:30 am. I was already up and ready by then. I wonder why I can not do the same when I have to go to the office. Matters not. Came down and saw that hot tea and rusks are waiting right next to a heap of blankets. I got me a cuppa and got into our jeep. Note to potential visitors: Do not mix morning tea and morning safaris on a cold day. Ranthambhore does not have scheduled pit stops and you never know what may be lurking on the other side of the bush you are “Marking your territory”. Anywho we were assigned Zone 4. This is the largest zone of all and the most bumpy ride of them all.

We got in and it was a misty morning. I did not even switch on my camera. There wasn’t much point in shooting anything till sun came out. We just enjoyed the views and marveled at the early morning wildlife. Slowly the golden light pierced through the mist and we saw a handsome blue bull sauntering away. A few minutes down the road we came across a couple of Sambar deers. Guide told me that both of them were male but the younger one was trying to get into good books of the older male. Well so much for the nature’s way. As we drove down on that cold misty morning, we came across three male Chinkaras playing in the grass.

Sambar Deer

Sambar Deer

On and on we drove till we got to a place called Semli in Zone 4. We saw a guard circling the pugmarks. As Salim spoke to the guard, our hopes of seeing the fuzzy orange cat were rekindled. A male tiger was supposed to have been around earlier that morning. So we decided to wait and listen for alarm calls. Almost magically the alarm calls started. Sambar started their barks. Then a langoor gave out warnings. A predator was in the vicinity. We decided to move a bit further and locate the source of the calls. Again we waited and the calls stopped. Whatever was lurking in the bushes disappeared. Or so we thought. As we started back, we came across fresh urine of a tiger merely 50 meters away from us. We were so close, yet so far. Then the bad jokes about seeing something related to tiger started (seeing the tiger part by part). We had gone on some roads in this zone that I would not even call roads. And no, I am not talking about bumpy jungle pathways. I am talking more like a vertical dive and accent.

We got back to the hotel and joined rest of the group for breakfast. Seems like there were some guests who had seen our tiger. Our tiger… but there was no worry. All of us were satisfied with seeing what was there to see. The orange stripped cat will have to wait.

After a heavy lunch we started back. As my luck would have it, I was back in Zone 4. While driving down in there, we came across wild boars having a party in Malik talao (Malik Lake). Instantly we said, Asterix and Obelix. Just a few meters away from us was a White throated kingfisher. Perched on a dead tree. It was one of the most vibrant birds I have seen.

Kingfisher

Kingfisher

Rolling down further in the forest we came across quite a few birds including Shikra, Black shouldered kite, Buzzard, Brahminy Duck, Storks etc. There were Spotted deers, sambars and jackals as well. My son was up by then and was thrilled to be on the bumpy roads. Who needs to know the calls of Deer when a 9 month old can say “aaaaa” and deer looks at you. 😀 Though he will not remember much, but I know he enjoys the outdoors (just like all other 9 month old).

Black Shouldered Kite

Black Shouldered Kite

Female Bluebull

Female Bluebull

As we passed the forest guard camps we decided to take a road less traveled. We were driving on the exterior wall of a dried lake and all of a sudden Salim asked driver to brake. Right there sitting a few meters away from us was a crested serpent eagle, perched on a dead tree. As we were on the wall, we were eye level with him. What a majestic bird. We were lucky. After patiently posing for us for a few minutes, it decided to take a flight. Unfortunately I was unprepared and got only a record shot.

Serpent Eagle

Serpent Eagle

Once again we came across some very fresh pugmarks and we started to follow them. I guess the Tiger god was not smiling down on us so the cat proved to be elusive once again. There were suggestions in the jeep that must be the guards dressed up as tigers to keep tourism up and some even more creative observations.

Brahminy Duck Or Rudy Shel Duck

Brahminy Duck Or rudy Shel Duck

Flame of the Forest

Flame of the Forest

As we came back, we met other people around the bonfire and one lucky fellow told me that he saw a tigers head in a different zone. My back was reminding me of the two rides I took in zone 4 on the same day. Once again a mix of great food and friends, folk music and a touch of Iodex took me back to dreamland.

____________________________________________________________

Part 2 should be up soon.

Note: All photographs shown are copyright by me. Do not copy or reproduce them without my express permission.





Hummer … Now everyone knows

2 12 2007
Now Everyone Knows

Now Everyone Knows

Stumbled across this link last night…. Funny as hell and so true 😀

The Original Link: Hummer, Now everyone knows





Simple Life

30 10 2007

Everyday people in Rajasthan





A prayer

25 10 2007

Came across this one from my old emails… It sure cracks me up even now

Our Father, who 0wnz heaven, j00 r0ck!
May all 0ur base someday be belong to you!
May j00 0wn earth just like j00 0wn heaven.
Give us this day our warez, mp3z, and pr0n through a phat pipe.
And cut us some slack when we act like n00b lamerz, just as we teach
n00bz when they act lame on us.
Please don’t give us root access on some poor d00d’z box when we’re
too pissed off to think about what’s right and wrong, and if you could
keep the fbi off our backs, we’d appreciate it.
For j00 0wn r00t on all our b0x3s 4ever and ever, 4m3n.





Its a slugs life

23 10 2007

As an example of things that you may be missing when you are looking at the big picture. I came across this guy when I went to the local park and decide to take a break and lie down a bit. After noticing this guy next to me, first thing I did was to check if there are any that I might have killed without knowing. Luckily no one was hurt 😀

Now, I am not an expert on bugs/slugs/worms/larva, heck I did not even study biology but I liked this fella to be quite fascinating. Like someone said, life is what happens when we are too busy to notice. Right now am in the middle of sorting through pictures of my recent India trip. Will post some when I am done processing them.





Desert Safari

5 09 2007

Desert Safari. You will obviously see desert, and Dubai has a lot of it. Don’t feel shy, hire a whole 4×4 for yourself/group and enjoy the fun.

First Element - Earth
Enjoy the thrilling ride while your ladcruiser drives mad around these crazy dunes. Trust me it takes some good off roading skills to drive around here.
Desert Driving

Enjoy the thrilling ride while your ladcruiser drives mad around these crazy dunes. Trust me it takes some good off roading skills to drive around here.

Falconry is an old tradition of Middle-East. I hurts me the most to see these magnificent birds to be treated this way. When you go to “Desert Safari” you come across a lot of things. One of them is these captive birds. You can take your picture with these falcons. I hate to see some ignorant parents letting their kids run wild and let them torture these birds. There is always an adventure in handling a predatory bird, but I have seen kids harassing these helpless birds. Pulling their wings, hitting them. Wish their parents can make them understand.

Bird of prey

And then one of the highlights of the evening 😀 The Belly Dancing

DSCF0529
DSCF0540
DSCF0541